Spatial clusters for potentially preventable hospitalisations for chronic conditions that may be amenable to allied health intervention in South Western Sydney

Dr Janelle Gifford1,2,3,4, Dr Soumya Mazumdar2,5, Dr Luke Arnold6, Mr Matthew Jennings2,7, Professor Bin Jalaludin2,3,8, Professor Sarah Dennis1,2,3

1University of Sydney, Camperdown, Australia, 2South Western Sydney Local Health District, Liverpool, Australia, 3Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, Australia, 4Charles Perkins Centre, Camperdown, Australia, 5South Western Sydney Clinical School, UNSW Medicine, Liverpool, Australia, 6South Western Sydney Primary Health Network, Macarthur Square, Australia, 7Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, Australia, 8University of NSW, Kensington, Australia

One aim of primary care is to support people to live well with chronic conditions in the community. Potentially preventable hospitalisations (PPHs) for chronic conditions are increasing in Australia. Many PPHs for chronic conditions may be amenable to allied health interventions and yet access to allied health professionals in South Western Sydney Local Health district (SWSLHD) is lower than more affluent areas in Sydney. The aim of this study is to identify hotspots of PPHs for chronic conditions which are amenable to allied health interventions with the potential to prevent admission. Hospital admission data on PPHs for chronic conditions for all age groups from all public hospitals in SWSLHD for 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2019 were sourced. Non-allied health-related PPH conditions were excluded. Geospatial analyses were used to identify hotspots of PPHs determined as excess risk relative to that expected for age and sex adjusted population in the postcodes. Hotspots for PPHs for chronic conditions were identified in parts of Liverpool, Fairfield, Bankstown and Campbelltown, areas known to have residents experiencing greater socioeconomic disadvantage who may be less able to afford allied health services. The next step is to map these hotspots to available allied health services in the area. These results may highlight access issues for people in these areas trying to live well with chronic disease who may benefit from allied health services. Addressing access to allied health for PPHs have economic implications for hospital services.


Biography:

I am an Advanced Accredited Pracitising Dietitian and Advanced Sports Dietitian and work in a research support role for allied health clinicians in South Western Sydney Local Health District. I am also a Senior Lecturer in the Sydney School of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney.

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