Interprofessional collaborative practice and interprofessional education opportunities during clinical placement are valuable to students

Ms Susan Stoikov1, Ms Kassie Shardlow1, Mr Ross Van Der Werff2, Mrs Cate Fitzgerald1

1Metro South Health, Woolloongabba, Australia, 2Darling Downs HHS, Toowoomba, Australia

Introduction
Interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) and interprofessional education (IPE) are effective at improving the delivery of healthcare to patients. However, little is known regarding the value placed on IPCP and IPE experiences during clinical placements and whether these experiences aid the transition to practice.

Methods
Physiotherapy clinical educators (CE), physiotherapy students and other allied health (AH) students undertaking clinical placements in metropolitan, regional and rural settings were surveyed to determine the perceived value of IPCP/IPE activities. Participants were asked if they felt IPCP/IPE activities were valuable and if they would aid the transition to practice. A mixed-methods approach was undertaken. Descriptive and non-parametric tests were conducted to describe the relationship between groups. A thematic analysis was undertaken to identify key themes.

Results
44 physiotherapy CE, 106 physiotherapy students and 115 other AH students completed the survey.

No differences in the value of IPCP/IPE during clinical placements were found between student groups. 84.6% of all students agreed or strongly agreed that IPCP and IPE activities added value to their clinical placements. 80.4% agreed or strongly agreed that IPCP/IPE activities would aid their transition to practice.

No difference was found in the value of IPCP/IPE during clinical placements between physiotherapy CEs and physiotherapy students. Physiotherapy CEs (95.5%) and physiotherapy students (83.2%) agreed or strongly agreed that IPCP/IPE activities added value to clinical placements.

Conclusion
IPCP and IPE activities are seen as valuable learning experiences during clinical placement and are recognised by students as key skills for new graduate health professionals.

Acknowledgements
The authors would like to thank the Directors of Physiotherapy Services Queensland ‘Clinical Education and Training Initiative’ for funding this project with support from the Allied Health Professions’ Office of Queensland. The authors would also like to acknowledge the contribution of the project steering committee, study sites and survey participants.


Biography:

Susan is a senior physiotherapist at the Princess Alexandra Hospital and has a keen interest in clinical education. Susan has recently submitted her PhD thesis identifying how students contribute during clinical placements and the transition from student to new graduate.

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